Psychotronic Film Society presents CONCRETE COWBOYS (1979)

  • The Sentient Bean 13 East Park Avenue Savannah, GA, 31401 United States

Showtime is 8 p.m., with $7 admission.

The PFS salutes the world-famous guitarist, singer, songwriter and actor Jerry Reed on the eighth anniversary of his death, with a screening of his little-known action comedy “Concrete Cowboys” at The Sentient Bean.

Known best for his role as Burt Reynold’s sidekick the Snowman in the “Smokey and The Bandit” film franchise of the 1970s and 1980s, or as one of the finest and most idiosyncratic guitarists and vocalists to ever emerge from the country music scene of the 1960s, Reed parlayed his devil-may-care “good ole boy” persona into a string of roles in feature films and television. 1979’s “Concrete Cowboys” was initially a made-for-TV movie, and stars Reed as one of two Montana ranch hands who are mistaken for private detectives during a sightseeing trip to Nashville, Tenn. (I mean, of course, right?) The other ranch hand is played by none other than Tom Selleck, and the female lead is played by none other than gussied up small-screen sex kitten Morgan Fairchild.

This humorous crime caper features no small number of cameos by top C&W stars of the day (no doubt doing their good buddy Reed a favor), and proved so well received that it begat a weekly, hour-long detective series of the same name. Unfortunately, by the time the series had been given the greenlight, Selleck had accepted the lead role in another weekly detective series called, wait for it ... “Magnum P.I.,” which was basically patterned on his character in “Concrete Cowboys,” sans redneckery. The “Concrete Cowboys” series ran for just one short season and found Jerry teamed up with a Selleck look-alike before both the original movie and the show lapsed into complete obscurity. Until now. Heh.

It’s actually surprisingly entertaining, and the pairing of Tom and Jerry (see what I did there?) works extremely well. Throw in the reliably great character actor Claude Akins (later of “Sheriff Lobo” fame), and you’ve got yourself a treat of a guilty hillbilly pleasure from the last days of disco.